На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
СЛОВАРИ ОНЛАЙН →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву pull-scen (459)

1 2 > >>
pull a long face
See: LONG FACE.
pull date
{n.}, {informal} The date stamped on baked goods, dairy products, or other perishable foods indicating the last day on which they may be sold before they must be removed ...
pull down
{v.}, {informal} 1. To catch (a ball) after a hard run. * /The outfielder pulled down a long drive to center field./ 2. To earn. * /Mr. Blake pulls down $500 a week./ * ...
pull down about one's ears
or[pull down around one's ears] See: ABOUT ONE'S EARS.
pull in
See: HAUL IN.
pull off
{v.}, {informal} To succeed in (something thought difficult or impossible); do. * /Ben Hogan pulled off the impossible by winning three golf tournaments in one year./ * ...
pull one's teeth
{v. phr.} To take power away from; make powerless. * /The general pulled the teeth of the rebel army by blocking its ammunition supply line./ * /The student ...
pull one's chestnuts out of the fire
To do someone else a great favor which they don't really deserve, doing oneself a disfavor in the process. * /Small countries often have to pull the chestnuts out of the ...
pull one's leg
{v. phr.}, {informal} To get someone to accept a ridiculous story as true; fool someone with a humorous account of something; trick. * /For a moment, I actually ...
pull one's punches
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. Not to hit as hard as you can. * /Jimmy pulled his punches and let Paul win the boxing match./ 2. To hide unpleasant facts or make them seem good. ...
pull one's weight
{v. phr.} To do your full share of work; do your part. * /In a small shop, it is important that each man pull his weight./ * /When Mother was sick in the hospital, ...
pull oneself together
{v. phr.} To become calm after being excited or disturbed; recover self-command; control yourself. * /It had been a disturbing moment, but he was able to pull ...
pull oneself up by the bootstraps
or[pull oneself up by one's own bootstraps] {adv. phr.} To succeed without help; succeed by your own efforts. * /He had to pull himself up by the bootstraps./
pull out
{v. phr.} 1. To withdraw; leave unceremoniously. * /The defeated army hastily pulled out of the occupied territories./ 2. To leave (said about trains). * /The train pulled ...
pull out of a hat
{v. phr.}, {informal} To get as if by magic; invent; imagine. * /When the introduction to a dictionary tells you how many hours went into its making, these figures were not ...
pull over
{v.} To drive to the side of the road and stop. * /The policeman told the speeder to pull over./ * /Everyone pulled over to let the ambulance pass./
pull rank
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To assert one's superior position or authority on a person of lower rank as in exacting a privilege or a favor. * /How come you always get ...
pull strings
or[pull wires] {v. phr.}, {informal} To secretly use influence and power, especially with people in charge or in important jobs to do or get something; make use of ...
pull the plug on
{v. phr.}, {slang} To expose (someone's) secret activities. * /The citizens' committee pulled the plug on the mayor, and he lost his election./
pull the rug out from under
{v. phr.}, {informal} To withdraw support unexpectedly from; to spoil the plans of. * /Bill thought he would be elected, but his friends pulled the rug out from under ...
pull the wool over one's eyes
{v. phr.}, {informal} To fool someone into thinking well of you; deceive. * /The businessman had pulled the wool over his partner's eyes about their financial ...
pull through
{v.} 1. To help through; bring safely through a difficulty or sudden trouble; save. * /A generous loan showed the bank's faith in Father and pulled him through the ...
pull together
{v.} To join your efforts with those of others; work on a task together; cooperate. * /Many men must pull together if a large business is to succeed./ * /Tim was a ...
pull up
{v.} 1. To check the forward motion of; halt; stop. * /He pulled up his horse at the gate./ 2. To tell (someone) to stop doing something; say (someone) is doing wrong ...
pull up one's socks
{v. phr.} To try to do better, either in terms of one's behavior or at a task one is performing. * /I'll have to pull up my socks if I am going to finish my work ...
pull up short
{v. phr.} To suddenly stop. * /He pulled up short in his red car at the corner when he saw a pregnant lady crossing./ * /When Mark saw that he was hurting Jill's feelings, ...
pull up stakes
{v. phr.}, {informal} To leave the place where you have been living. * /We are going to pull up stakes and move to California./ * /The Jones family pulled up stakes ...
pull wires
See: PULL STRINGS.
pullout
{n.} An evacuation. * /The pullout of the American military proceeded on schedule./
punch
See: BEAT TO THE PUNCH, PACK A PUNCH, PULL ONE'S PUNCHES, TAKE A PUNCH AT.
punch-drunk
{adj.} 1. Dazed or become dulled in the mind from being hit in the head. * /He was a punch-drunk boxer who made his living shining shoes./ 2. In a foggy state of ...
puppy love
also[calf love] {n.}, {informal} The first love of very young people. * /When John and Mary began going around together in junior high school, their parents said it was ...
pure and simple
{adj.} Simply stated; basic. - Follows the noun it modifies and is used for emphasis. * /The problem, pure and simple, is finding a baby-sitter./ * /The question, pure ...
purpose
See: AT CROSS PURPOSES, ON PURPOSE, TO ALL INTENTS AND PURPOSES.
purse
See: LINE ONE'S POCKETS also LINE ONE'S PURSE.
purse strings
{n.} Care or control of money. * /Dad holds the purse strings in our family./ * /The treasurer refused to let go of the club's purse strings./
push around
{v.}, {informal} To be bossy with; bully. * /Don't try to push me around!/ * /Paul is always pushing the smaller children around./
push off
or[shove off] {v.} 1. To push a boat away from the shore. * /Before Tom could reach the boat, Jake had shoved off./ 2. {slang} To start; leave. * /We were ready to push ...
push on
{v. phr.} To press forward; proceed forward laboriously. * /The exhausted mountain climbers pushed on, despite the rough weather, as the peak was already in sight./ ...
push one's luck
See: PRESS ONE'S LUCK.
push over
{v. phr.} To upset; overthrow. * /She is standing on her feet very solidly; a little criticism from you certainly won't push her over./ * /The wind in Chicago can be so ...
push the panic button
{v. phr.}, {slang} To become very much frightened; nervous or excited, especially at a time of danger or worry. * /John thought he saw a ghost and pushed the panic ...
push up daisies
{v. phr.}, {slang} To be dead and buried. * /I'll be around when you're pushing up daisies./ * /Don't play with guns or you may push up the daisies./
push-up
{n.} An exercise to build strong arms and shoulders, in which you lie on your stomach and push your body up on your hands and toes. * /At the age of seventy, Grandpa still ...
pushover
{n.} 1. Something easy to accomplish or overcome. * /For Howard steering a boat is a pushover as he was raised on a tropical island./ 2. A person easily seduced. * /It is ...
put
See: HARD PUT or HARD PUT TO IT, STAY PUT.
put out
{v.} 1. To make a flame or light stop burning; extinguish; turn off. * /Please put the light out when you leave the room./ * /The firemen put out the blaze./ ...
put to it
{adj. phr.} Hard pressed; having trouble; in difficulty; puzzled. * /When he lost his job, he was rather put to it for a while to provide for his family./ * /The boy ...
put (it) in black and white
See: BLACK AND WHITE.
put (it) in writing
See: BLACK AND WHITE.