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СЛОВАРИ ОНЛАЙН →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву come-does (459)

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come again
{v.}, {informal} Please repeat; please say that again. - Usually used as a command. * /"Harry has just come into a fortune," my wife said. "Come again? " I asked her, not ...
come alive
or[come to life] {v.} 1. {informal} To become alert or attentive; wake up and look alive; become active. * /When Mr. Simmons mentioned money, the boys came alive./ ...
come along
{v.} To make progress; improve; succeed. * /He was coming along well after the operation./ * /Rose is coming right along on the piano./
come apart at the seams
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To become upset to the point where one loses self-control and composure as if having suffered a sudden nervous breakdown. * /After his ...
come around
See: COME ROUND.
come at
{v.} 1. To approach; come to or against; advance toward. * /The young boxer came at the champion cautiously./ 2. To understand (a word or idea) or master (a skill); ...
come back
{v.}, {informal} 1. To reply; answer. * /The lawyer came back sharply in defense of his client./ * /No matter how the audience heckled him, the comedian always had an ...
come back to earth
or[come down to earth] {v. phr.} To return to the real world; stop imagining or dreaming; think and behave as usual. * /After Jane met the movie star it was hard for her to come ...
come by
{v.} To get; obtain; acquire. * /A good job like that is hard to come by./ * /Money easily come by is often easily spent./ * /How did she come by that money?/
come clean
{v. phr.}, {slang} To tell all; tell the whole story; confess. * /The boy suspected of stealing the watch came clean after long questioning./
come down
{v.} 1. To reduce itself; amount to no more than. - Followed by "to". * /The quarrel finally came down to a question of which boy would do the dishes./ Syn.: BOIL ...
come down hard on
{v.}, {informal} 1. To scold or punish strongly. * /The principal came down hard on the boys for breaking the window./ 2. To oppose strongly. * /The minister in his ...
come down in the world
{v. phr.} To lose a place of respect or honor, become lower (as in rank or fortune). * /The stranger plainly had come down a long way in the world./ Compare: DOWN ON ...
come down off one's high horse
{v. phr.} To become less arrogant; to assume a more modest disposition. * /The boastful candidate for Congress quickly came down off his high horse when he was soundly ...
come down on like a ton of bricks
{v. phr.}, {slang} To direct one's full anger at somebody. * /When the janitor was late for work, the manager came down on him like a ton of bricks./
come down to earth
See: COME BACK TO EARTH.
come down with
{v.}, {informal} To become sick with; catch. * /We all came down with the mumps./ * /After being out in the rain, George came down with a cold./
come from far and wide
{v. phr.} To originate or hail from many different places. * /The students at this university come from far and wide and speak many languages./
come full circle
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To become totally opposed to one's own earlier conviction on a given subject. * /Today's conservative businessperson has come full circle from ...
come hell or high water
{adv. phr.}, {informal} No matter what happens; whatever may come. * /Grandfather said he would go to the fair, come hell or high water./ Compare: COME WHAT MAY, ...
come home to roost
See: CHICKENS COME HOME TO ROOST.
come in for
{v.} To receive. * /He came in for a small fortune when his uncle died./ * /His conduct came in for much criticism./
come in handy
{v. phr.}, {informal} To prove useful. * /Robinson Crusoe found tools in the ship which came in handy when he built a house./ * /The French he learned in high school came in ...
come into
{v.} To receive, especially after another's death; get possession of. * /He came into a lot of money when his father died./ * /He came into possession of the farm after his ...
come into one's own
{v. phr.} To receive the wealth or respect that you should have. * /John's grandfather died and left him a million dollars; when John is 21, he will come into his ...
come of
{v.} 1. To result from. * /After all the energy we spent on that advertising campaign, absolutely nothing came of it./ 2. To become of; happen to. * /"Whatever became of ...
come of age
See: OF AGE.
come off
{v.} 1. To take place; happen. * /The picnic came off at last, after being twice postponed./ 2. {informal} To do well; succeed. * /The attempt to bring the quarreling couple ...
come off it
also[get off it] {v. phr.}, {slang} Stop pretending; bragging, or kidding; stop being silly. - Used as a command. * /"So I said to the duchess..." Jimmy began. "Oh, come off ...
come off second best
{v. phr.} To not win first but only second, third, etc. place. * /Our home team came off second best against the visitors./ * /Sue complains that she always comes off ...
come on
{v.} 1. To begin; appear. * /Rain came on toward morning./ * /He felt a cold coming on./ 2. To grow or do well; thrive. * /The wheat was coming on./ * /His business ...
come on strong
{v. phr.}, {slang} To overwhelm a weaker person with excessively strong language, personality, or mannerisms; to insist extremely strongly and claim something with ...
come one's way
{v. phr.} To be experienced by someone; happen to you. * /Tom said that if the chance to become a sailor ever came his way, he would take it./ * /I hope bad luck isn't ...
come out
{v.} 1. {Of a girl:} To be formally introduced to polite society at about age eighteen, usually at a party; begin to go to big parties, * /In society, girls come out when they ...
come out for
{v. phr.} To support; declare oneself in favor of another, especially during a political election. * /Candidates for the presidency of the United States are anxious for the ...