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Слова на букву fill-get (459)

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fill in
{v.} 1. To write words needed in blanks; put in; fill. * /You should fill in all the blanks on an application for a job./ 2. {informal} To tell what you should know. * /The ...
fill one's shoes
{v. phr.} To take the place of another and do as well; to substitute satisfactorily for. * /When Jack got hurt, the coach had nobody to fill his shoes./ * /Joe hopes to ...
fill out
{v.} 1. To put in what is missing; complete; finish; {especially}, to complete (a printed application blank or other form) by writing the missing facts in the blank spaces; ...
fill the bases
See: LOAD THE BASES.
fill the bill
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be just what is needed; be good enough for something; be just right. * /The boss was worried about hiring a deaf boy, but after he tried Tom out ...
fill up
or[fill it up] or[fill her up] {v. phr.} To fill entirely. (Said by the driver of a car to a gas station attendant). * /When the attendant asked Andrew how much gas he ...
filthy lucre
{n.}, {informal} Money, especially when thought of as bad or shameful. * /When the rich gambler tried to make Sarah marry him, she said, "Keep your filthy lucre - I shall ...
filthy rich
{adj. phr.} Extremely rich but without cultural refinement; nouveau riche. * /"The Murgatroyds are filthy rich," Ted complained. "They are rolling in money but they ...
find
or[get one's bearings] {v. phr.} To know where one is or where one is headed. * /"Without a compass," the sergeant warned the enlisted men, "you will never find your ...
find fault
{v. phr.} To find something wrong; complain; criticize. * /She tries to please him, but he always finds fault./ * /They found fault with every box I made./ ...
find it in one's heart
{v. phr.} To be able or willing because of your nature. * /He could not find it in his heart to tell her about her mother's death./ * /Can you find it in your heart to ...
find one's ---
{v. phr.} To become able to use (some power of the body or mind.) * /In the program for the parents, John was nervous and could not speak at first; then he found his ...
find oneself
{v. phr.} To find out what one is fitted for and succeed in that. * /Mary tried several lines of work, but at last found herself as a teacher./ * /Sometimes young ...
find out
{v.} 1. To learn or discover (something you did not know before.) * /One morning the baby found out for the first time that she could walk./ * /I don't know how this car ...
find out the hard way
See: HARD WAY.
finders keepers
or[finders keepers, losers weepers] {informal} Those who find lost things can keep them. - Used usually by children to claim the right to keep something they have found. * ...
fine feathers do not make fine birds
{literary} A person who wears fine clothes may not be as good as he looks. - A proverb. * /Mary is pretty and she wears pretty clothes, but she is very mean. Fine ...
fine kettle of fish
See: KETTLE OF FISH.
fine-tooth comb
{n. phr.} Great care; careful attention so as not to miss anything. * /The police searched the scene of the crime with a fine-tooth comb for clues./ * /My room is so clean ...
finger
See: BURN ONE'S FINGERS, CROSS ONE'S FINGERS or KEEP ONE'S FINGERS CROSSED, LAY A FINGER ON, LIFT A FINGER, PUT ONE'S FINGER ON also LAY ONE'S FINGER ON, SLIP THROUGH ...
finger in the pie
{n. phr.}, {informal} Something to do with what happens; part interest or responsibility. * /When the girls got up a Christmas party, I felt sure Alice had a finger in the ...
fingertip
See: AT ONE'S FINGERTIPS.
finish up
See: END UP(4).
fire
See: BALL OF FIRE, BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA or BETWEEN TWO FIRES, BUILD A FIRE UNDER, BURNT CHILD DREADS THE FIRE, CATCH FIRE, DRAW FIRE, FAT'S IN THE ...
firebug
{n.} An arsonist; one who willfully sets fire to property. * /The police caught the firebug just as he was about to set another barn ablaze in the country./
firing squad
{n.} A group of soldiers chosen to shoot a prisoner to death or to fire shots over a grave as a tribute. * /A dictator often sends his enemies before a firing squad./ * ...
first
See: AT FIRST BLUSH, AT FIRST SIGHT, CAST THE FIRST STONE, GET TO FIRST BASE or REACH FIRST BASE, IN THE FIRST PLACE, OF THE FIRST WATER.
first things first
Other things must wait until the most important and necessary things are done. * /Study your lessons before you go out to play. First things first./
first and last
{adv. phr.} Most noticeably; all the time; chiefly. * /He was first and last a school teacher./ * /Steven joined the army because first and last he wanted to help his ...
first and foremost
{adv. phr.} As the most important thing; first. * /First and foremost they needed food./ * /I want you to remember to pay that bill first and foremost./ * /First ...
first base
{n. phr.} 1. The base that must be touched first by a baseball player after batting. * /He got to first base on four balls./ 2. See: GET TO FIRST BASE.
first class
{n.} 1. The first rank; the highest class; the best group. * /The pianist was quite good but he was not in the first class./ 2. The most expensive or comfortable class of ...
first come, first served
{truncated sent.}, {informal} If you arrive first, you will be served first; people will be waited on in the order they come; the person who comes first will have his ...
first cousin
{n.} The child of your aunt or uncle. * /Tom's only first cousin was Ralph, the son of his Uncle John./
first of all
{adv. phr.} Chiefly; primarily; as the first thing. * /After we get to Chicago, we will, first of all, try to find a reliable used car./
first off
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Before anything else; first. * /First off, I want you to mow the lawn./
first stone
See: CAST THE FIRST STONE.
first string(1)
{n.}, {informal} 1. The best group of players on a team; first team; A team. * /Dick loved basketball and practiced hard until he was put on the first string./ 2. The ...
first thing off the bat
{adv. phr.} Immediately; at once. * /He called home from Paris first thing off the bat as he stepped off the plane./
first-class(1)
{adj.} 1. Of the highest class or best kind; excellent; first-rate. * /Jane did a first-class job of repairing the coat./ * /It was a first-class TV program./ Compare: ...
first-class(2)
{adv.} With the best material; in the best or most expensive way. * /When Mr. Van Smith goes anywhere he always travels first-class./ * /"How did you send the package?" ...
first-run
{adj. phr.} Shown for the first time; new. * /The local theater showed only first-run movies./
first-string
{adj.}, {informal} 1. On the starting team or A team. * /He was the first-string quarterback./ 2. Of the best quality; foremost. * /He was the least expensive of the ...
firsthand
{adj.} Fresh; genuine; from the original source. * /John says he got the information firsthand from the president himself./
fish
See: COLD FISH, KETTLE OF FISH, NEITHER FISH NOR FOWL, NOT THE ONLY FISH IN THE SEA, OTHER FISH TO FRY.
fish for
{v.}, {informal} To try to get or to find out (something), by hinting or by a roundabout way to try to lead someone else to give or tell you what you want by hinting. ...
fish for a compliment
{v, phr.} To try to make someone pay a compliment. * /When Jim showed me his new car, I could tell that he was fishing for a compliment./
fish fry
{n.} An outdoor party or picnic at which fish are fried and eaten. * /The guests at the fish fry caught and cooked their own fish./
fish in muddy
or[troubled waters] {v. phr.} To take advantage of a troubled or confusing situation; seek personal advantage. * /With the police disorganized after the collapse of ...
fish or cut bait
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. Decide what you want to do and stop wasting time; either act now or give someone else a chance or turn. * /Jack couldn't decide whether to go to ...
fish out of water
{n. phr.} A person who is out of his proper place in life; someone who does not fit in. * /Because Ed could not swim, he felt like a fish out of water at the beach./ ...
fish story
{n. phr.} An unlikely or improbable tale. * /Hunters and fishermen often exaggerate their successes by telling fish stories./
fish-and-chips
{n. phr.} Fried fish and french fried potatoes. * /The family went to a drive-in restaurant and had fish-and-chips./
fist
See: HARD-FISTED.
fit
See: BY FITS AND STARTS, GIVE PITS, HAVE A FIT or HAVE FITS, IF THE SHOE FITS, WEAR IT, SEE FIT also THINK FIT, SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST.
fit as a fiddle
{adj. phr.} In very good health. * /The man was almost 90 years old but fit as a fiddle./ * /Mary rested at home for a few weeks after her operation; then she felt fit as ...
fit for
{v. phr.} To be suited for; be prepared for. * /"What kind of job is Ted fit for?" the social worker asked./
fit in with
{v. phr.} To fall into agreement or accord with. * /His plans to take a vacation in early July fit in perfectly with the university schedule./
fit like a glove
{v. phr.} To fit perfectly. * /Her new dress fits her like a glove./
fit out
or[fit up] {v.} To give things needed; furnish. * /The soldiers were fitted out with guns and clothing./ * /The government fitted out warships and got sailors for them./ * ...
fit the bill
See: FILL THE BILL.
fit to a T
See: TO A T.
fit to be tied(1)
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Very angry or upset. * /She was fit to be tied when she saw the broken glass./
fit to be tied(2)
{adv. phr.}, {substandard} Very hard. - Used for emphasis. * /Uncle Willie was laughing fit to be tied at the surprised look on Mother's face./
five o'clock shadow
{n. phr.} A very short growth of beard on a man's face who did shave in the morning but whose beard is so strong that it is again visible in the afternoon. * /"You have a ...
fix
See: GET A FIX or GIVE SOMEONE A FIX, GET A FIX ON.
fix someone up with
{v. phr.}, {informal} To help another get a date with a woman or man by arranging a meeting for the two. * /Say Joe, can you possibly fix me up with someone this weekend? ...
fix someone's wagon
or[fix someone's little red wagon] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. (Said to a child as a threat) to administer a spanking. * /Stop that right away or I'll fix your ...
fix up
{v. phr.} 1. To repair. * /The school is having the old gym fixed up./ 2. To arrange. * /I think I can fix it up with the company so that John gets the transfer he ...
fizzle out
{v.}, {informal} 1. To stop burning; die out. * /The fuse fizzled out before exploding the firecracker./ 2. To fail after a good start; end in failure. * /The power mower ...
flag down
{v.}, {informal} To stop by waving a signal flag or as if waving a signal flag. * /The signalman flagged down the freight train./ * /A policeman flagged down the car with ...
flakeball
or[flake] {n.}, {slang}, {drug culture} A disjointed, or "flaky" person, who is forgetful and incoherent, as if under the influence of narcotics. * /Hermione is a regular ...
flame
See: ADD FUEL TO THE FLAME, GO UP IN FLAMES.
flanker back
{n.} A football back who can play far to the outside of his regular place. * /The coach is still looking for a speedy boy to play flanker back./
flare up
{v.} 1. To burn brightly for a short time especially after having died down. * /The fire flared up again and then died./ 2. To become suddenly angry. * /The mayor flared ...
flare-up
{n.} The reoccurrence of an infection or an armed conflict. * /He had a flare-up of his arthritis./ * /There was a bad flare-up of hostilities in some countries./
flash
See: IN A FLASH.
flash card
{n.} A card with numbers or words on it that is used in teaching, a class. * /The teacher used flash cards to drill the class in addition./
flash in the pan
{n. phr.}, {slang} A person or thing that starts out well but does not continue. * /The new quarterback was a flash in the pan./ * /Mary got 100 on the first test in arithmetic ...
flat
See: FALL FLAT, IN NO TIME or IN NOTHING FLAT, LEAVE FLAT.
flat as a pancake
{adj. phr.} Very level; very flat; having no mountains or hills. * /A great part of the American Midwest is as flat as a pancake./
flat broke
See: STONE-BROKE.
flat-footed
{adj.}, {informal} 1. Straightforward; forthright; direct; outright. * /The governor issued a flat-footed denial of the accusation./ * /He came out flat-footed against the ...
flat-out
{adv. phr.}, {informal} 1. Without hiding anything; plainly; openly. * /The student told his teacher flat-out that he was not listening to her./ 2. At top speed; as fast ...
flatfoot
{n.}, {slang}, {derogatory} A policeman. * /"What does Joe do for a living? - He's a flatfoot."/
flatter oneself
To be sure of your own talent or skill; highly confident. * /I flatter myself that I am a better swimmer than he is./
flea in one's ear
{n. phr.}, {informal} An idea or answer that is not welcome; an annoying or surprisingly sharp reply or hint. * /I'll put a flea in his ear if he bothers me once more./
flea market
{n. phr.} A place where antiques, second-hand things, and cheap articles are sold, and especially one in the open air. * /The local antique dealers held a flea market ...
flesh
See: IN PERSON also IN THE FLESH, NEITHER FISH NOR FOWL also NEITHER FISH, FLESH, NOR FOWL, PRESS THE FLESH, THORN IN THE FLESH.
flesh and blood
{n.} 1. A close relative (as a father, daughter, brother); close relatives. Used in the phrase "one's own flesh and blood". * /Such an answer from her - and she's my own ...
flesh out
{v.}, {informal} 1. To add to; make fuller, bigger, or longer. * /The author fleshed out his story by adding more about his war experiences./ 2. also[flesh up] To become ...
flesh up
See: FLESH OUT(2).
flfty-flfty(1)
{adv.}, {informal} Equally; evenly. * /The two boys divided the marbles they won fifty-fifty./ * /When Dick and Sam bought an old car, they divided the cost fifty-fifty./
fling oneself at
See: THROW ONESELF AT.
fling oneself at someone's head
See: THROW ONESELF AT SOMEONE'S HEAD.
flip one's lid
also[flip one's wig] {slang} 1. To lose one's temper. * /When that pushy salesman came back Mom really flipped her lid./ Compare: BLOW A FUSE. 2. To lose your mind; ...
flip out
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To go insane, to go out of one's mind. * /A is impossible to talk to Joe today - he must have flipped out./
flip-flop(1)
{v.}, {informal} To alternate the positions of; exchange the places of; switch. * /The football coach had one play in which he flip-flopped his left halfback and .